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Those who attempt to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail are heroes. Take the hike with them by reading these thru-hikers' tales.

If you read enough 2016 Appalachian Trail hiker stories, you learn that each attempt is a victory unto itself, whether or not every goal is achieved.

Thousands of hikers are attempting a thru-hike of the AT. Only 25% will make it to Mt. Katahdin, but they'll all have great Appalachian Trail Hiker Stories.

How many stories do you need to read to inspire yourself to hike the Appalachian Trail? Are these Thru-Hikers' Tales from 2014 enough? We hope so.

Most of us will never thru-hike the Appalachian Trail. We can come pretty close, however, by reading these thru-hikers' tales.

Thinking about taking on the Appalachian Trail? Get the best advice anywhere! Read the 2012 Thru-Hikers' Tales from folks who gave it their best.

The case of the hiker who went missing from the Appalachian Trail in Maine in 2013 gets curiouser and curiouser with news of Geraldine Largay's journal.

Baltimore Jack Tarlin -- the man, the Appalachian Trail legend -- reached the end of his trail on May 4, 2016 at Angel Medical Center in Franklin, NC.

Bill Irwin did more for the Appalachian Trail than the Trail did for him. Bill gave hope to timid hikers who said, "If a blind man can do it, so can I!"

Paul Paur began a walk on the Appalachian Trail in early June 2014. Does he represent a danger to others? Or is he just a lost soul wandering in the woods?

The search for missing Appalachian Trail hiker Gerry Largay has frustrated search and rescue experts. They say, "No one just disappears."

Allow me to introduce you to Maria McCabe who opens her home to Appalachian Trail hikers in Salisbury, Connecticut. It's a lovely area, as you'll see.

Is there a cure for Trail Fever? Yup. Accept Miss Janet's invitation to the Hiker Thanksgiving Celebration she's hosting in Hot Springs, North Carolina.

If you haven't formed an insanely devout opinion about Warren Doyle already, go to WarrenDoyle.com to see what the fuss is all about.

Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay, whose Trail name was "Inchworm" due to her speed, disappeared from the Trail in Maine one year ago. Where is she?

Geraldine Largay, an experienced hiker and nurse, vanished from the Appalachian Trail two years ago on July 22, 1013. Where is the lady we called Inchworm?

Hard to believe it's been seven years since Meredith Hope Emerson didn't return from her Appalachian Trail hike on Blood Mountain. We'll never forget.

Read the State of Maine's Medical Examiner's report of the death of Geraldine Largay here.

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Ruth Boden hikes to mountaintops to play her cello because ... well, it's hard to say why. We'll let Ruth explain it to you herself.

So, I met this guy named Mark. A potential thru-hiker from Detroit. I will forget Mark someday, but I will always remember his 64-pound pack.

If you read enough 2016 Appalachian Trail hiker stories, you learn that each attempt is a victory unto itself, whether or not every goal is achieved.

Is there a cure for Trail Fever? Yup. Accept Miss Janet's invitation to the Hiker Thanksgiving Celebration she's hosting in Hot Springs, North Carolina.

Congratulations to ultramarathoner Karl Meltzer for breaking the fastest known time (FKT) for an assisted thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail.

Florida resident Hollie Lyle, Jr., won a $1M lottery prize that he's planning to use hiking the Appalachian Trail with his wife. Well played, Hollie.

Sharon MamaGoose Smith encountered a snorting bear while camping near the Pacific Coast Trail. What would you do if you met a bear in the woods?

Karl Metzler's third attempt to set the fastest known time (FKT) for hiking/running the Appalachian Trail begins in early August, 2016.

Stacey Kozel's story begins with "I have always wanted to hike the AT but after becoming paralyzed in March 2014." Today, she's hiking the Appalachian Trail

Patrick Burnes, 59, of Buford, Georgia, was was rescued from the Appalachian Trail in Maine on Wednesday, July 6, 2016, after he broke his ankle.

Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay, whose Trail name was "Inchworm" due to her speed, disappeared from the Trail in Maine one year ago. Where is she?

Geraldine Largay, an experienced hiker and nurse, vanished from the Appalachian Trail two years ago on July 22, 1013. Where is the lady we called Inchworm?

Trail Angel Miss Janet plans a Happy Trails Hiker Trash Celebration at Trail Days in Damascus on May 14, 2016, celebrating the life of Baltimore Jack.

The case of the hiker who went missing from the Appalachian Trail in Maine in 2013 gets curiouser and curiouser with news of Geraldine Largay's journal.

You are more likely to be killed by a coconut falling from a tree than by a pesky bear while hiking the Appalachian Trail.

Baltimore Jack Tarlin -- the man, the Appalachian Trail legend -- reached the end of his trail on May 4, 2016 at Angel Medical Center in Franklin, NC.

Those who attempt to thru-hike the Appalachian Trail are heroes. Take the hike with them by reading these thru-hikers' tales.

Thinking about taking on the Appalachian Trail? Get the best advice anywhere! Read the 2012 Thru-Hikers' Tales from folks who gave it their best.

Most of us will never thru-hike the Appalachian Trail. We can come pretty close, however, by reading these thru-hikers' tales.

How many stories do you need to read to inspire yourself to hike the Appalachian Trail? Are these Thru-Hikers' Tales from 2014 enough? We hope so.

Thousands of hikers are attempting a thru-hike of the AT. Only 25% will make it to Mt. Katahdin, but they'll all have great Appalachian Trail Hiker Stories.

An Appalachian Trail thru-hike isn't what you might expect, as these reflections by Rick "Bearfoot" Hatcher attest.

Thru-hiker hopefuls got their first taste of Trail Magic at Gooch Gap, 17.2 miles from the start of the Appalachian Trail.

Read the State of Maine's Medical Examiner's report of the death of Geraldine Largay here.

If you haven't formed an insanely devout opinion about Warren Doyle already, go to WarrenDoyle.com to see what the fuss is all about.

As we have since 2012, we're going to post links to the tales of Appalachian Trail hikers in 2016.

Niki Rellon "Bionic Woman" Lost a Leg & Hiked the Appalachian Trail.

Mel "Two-Eagles" Jellison might not finish his thru-hike. We commend him for loving the Appalachian Trail & visiting her often. You're welcome to join him.

Maine's Office of Chief Medical Examiner used DNA analysis to positively identify the skeletal remains of Geraldine Largay, found on October 14, 2015.

If you really want to know what it's like to thru-hike the Trail, read these Appalachian Trail hiker stories. Not everyone wins or gets a trophy for trying.

Sean Gobin founded Warrior Hike in 2012 to help combat veterans "walk off the war" on the Appalachian Trail (and others) before returning to civilian life.

Abraham Lincoln didn't make a time-lapse video when he grew his beard. Appalachian Trail hiker, 3-D, did. View it here & meet the man behind the beard.

Twister (aka James Irvin) is the Poster Child for Appalachian Trail Flip-Flop Hikes! Unless you want to summit Maine's Mt. Katahdin in winter conditions.

The Maine Warden Service says flooding on the Appalachian Trail led to a search & rescue mission. The three hikers rescued, 2 women and a man, are now safe.

Heather "Anish" Anderson set the fastest known time for hiking the entire Appalachian Trail, without support from others, 54 days, 7 hours and 48 minutes.

Baxter State Park issued three citations to Scott Jurek for actions after setting the record for fastest known time for running the Appalachian Trail.

Michael Kirkpatrick, a 29-year-old veteran with PTSD, disappeared on July 19, 2015. He reappeared August 18th and said he's hiking the Appalachian Trail.

Scott Jurek has hired lawyers to defend himself against three citations issued to him by Baxter State Park after his record-setting Appalachian Trail run.

Appalachian Trail hiker, William Appleby, was rescued by Allie Ladd, the Maine Warden Service and others near Rangeley, Maine, on August 14, 2015.

Our Screwy Story of the Week comes from the Delaware Water Gap, where an Appalachian Hiker fell from a tree and was rescued by (ready?) the Coast Guard.

You're a champion kick-boxer, climber, skier & long distance hiker. You lose a leg in an accident. Do you give up or follow Niki Rellon & hike the AT?

Scott Jurek ran, walked, crawled & dragged his butt from Georgia to Maine faster than all assisted Appalachian Trail hikers. But, did he shatter the record?

Scott Jurek's Appalachian Trail run to Katahdin will end today, Day 46, July 12, 2015. Fueled by a plant-based diet and the loving care of his wife, Jenny.

Long-distance runner & super-hero Scott Jurek seeks his "masterpiece" accomplishment: breaking the speed-hike record of the Appalachian Trail.

Scott Jurek has until 5:15 PM on Sunday, July 12th, 2015 to set the fastest known time for thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail. Here's where he is now.

Scott Jurek has two days to break Jennifer Pharr Davis's 46-day record for running the entire Appalachian Trail. Scott is 135 miles away. Will he make it?

Know anyone hiking the Appalachian Trail -- seeking the fame, honor & fortune that comes to all who thru-hike? We do. Read their tales of winning & woe.

Jason Parish's life ended when a tree limb took his life while camping on the Appalachian Trail, 3-15-15. His positive influence on the AT lives on.

We regret to inform you of the death of Jason Parish, 36, of Philadelphia, PA, who died while camping along the Appalachian Trail at the Ed Garvey shelter.

Time to put away snow blowers, shovels & snowy blues. It's time for hikers to hit the Trail! Let the 2015 Appalachian Trail Stories begin! Who'll finish?

Seven years ago, we lost hope of finding Meredith Hope Emerson alive following her disappearance on a New Year's Day hike on the Appalachian Trail.

Hard to believe it's been seven years since Meredith Hope Emerson didn't return from her Appalachian Trail hike on Blood Mountain. We'll never forget.

It might not be winter where you are but it's winter at Maine's Baxter State Park, home to Mt. Katahdin, where two ill-equipped men went for a foolish hike.

Earl Shaffer (1918-2002) was a World War Two veteran from rural Pennsylvania and the first man to walk the Applachian Trail. He completed his hike in 1948.

Earl Shaffer is one of the great pioneers of the Appalachian Trail. He's the first person to thru-hike the Trail in one continuous hike from end to end.

Volunteer Trail Blazer Vetice Bates was injured in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park's Snake Den Ridge Trail on 10-25-14. He was rescued and is safe.

"They say" 25% of those who try to hike the AT make it from end to end. These Appalachian Trail Thru-Hikers' Tales tell you, firsthand, how they made it.

Finding ways to do Trail Magic -- random kindness toward Appalachian Trail thru-hikers -- is easy at Franconia Notch State Park in New Hampshire.

Members of the Kallin family completed their Appalachian Trail thru-hike by climbing to the top of Mt. Katahdin on August 31, 2014! Hoorah for the Kallins!

Allow me to introduce you to Maria McCabe who opens her home to Appalachian Trail hikers in Salisbury, Connecticut. It's a lovely area, as you'll see.

Ron Brown is the man you want to meet if you ever hope to hike northbound on the Appalachian Trail from Amicalola Falls State Park in Georgia.

The section of the Appalachian Trail in Maine known as the 100-mile-wilderness is desolate, but sometimes you can find a little Nectar.

The search for "Inchworm" has been futile. Now, lost hiker Gerry Largay needs a miracle.

It's hard to believe that no clues have been found regarding "Inchworm" -- the AT hiker still missing in Maine.

The valiant search for Gerry Largay continues on and around the Appalachian Trail in Maine.

Reading news reports and blogs of Appalachian Trail Thru-Hikers' tales is more inspirational than informational, but you can't finish the AT without both.

A $15,000 reward has been offered for clues leading to the solution of the mysterious disappearance of Appalachian Hiker Gerry Largay in Maine.

Bill Irwin did more for the Appalachian Trail than the Trail did for him. Bill gave hope to timid hikers who said, "If a blind man can do it, so can I!"

Maine Wardens returned to the Appalachian Trail to search for Gerry Largay, aka "Inchworm." Again, they found no new clues.

The search for missing Appalachian Trail hiker Gerry Largay has frustrated search and rescue experts. They say, "No one just disappears."

Volunteers hit the Appalachian Trail once again to search for clues about the disappearance of hiker Geraldine "Inchworm" Largay.

Searchers scoured the Appalachian Trail in Maine looking for missing hiker Gerry Largay, aka "Inchworm." They say, "She's not there."

The Appalachian Trail is 2,185.3 miles long. Those who hike it all are "thru-hikers." Could these Thru-Hikers' Tales for 2014 inspire you to hit the Trail?

Paul Paur began a walk on the Appalachian Trail in early June 2014. Does he represent a danger to others? Or is he just a lost soul wandering in the woods?

Roger Poulin -- a deaf-blind Appalachian Trail hiker -- finished his four-year trek recently. "Rambling Shamrock" (aka Roni Lepore) led the entire way.

Dwayne Parton arrived at the top of Mount Katahdin just 96 days after setting out from Georgia. With his dog following beside him.