Update: Day 44 for Scott Jurek's Attempt to Break 46-Day AT Record

Scott Jurek's position as of 2 PM on July 9th according to https://share.delorme.com/scottjurek

Scott Jurek's position as of 2 PM on July 9th according to https://share.delorme.com/scottjurek

It's getting down to where the running shoes meet the Trail for Scott Jurek. He has just two days to set a new record for speed-hiking and/or running the Appalachian Trail.

Here's our 2 PM update on Thursday, July 9, 2015.

Scott Jurek is eating up the miles running the Appalachian Trail (AT) from Georgia to Maine.

He is making this jaunt look as easy as it was for his book, Eat and Run, to hit The New York Times' list of best sellers. Scott believes his diet of solely plant-based foods fuels his endurance records for long-distance running.

Jennifer Pharr Davis is current record-holder for the quickest supported hike of the entire AT (now 2,189.2 miles long). She set the mark of 46 days, 11 hours and 20 minutes in 2011.

Note to Everyone Who Says Jennifer Pharr Davis Did Not Run the AT, She Walked Very Fast for Long Hours Every Day: Yes, Jenn says she did not run the Appalachian Trail. When you walk faster than I can run, however, I think you are running. Thank you.

As of 5 PM on Tuesday, July 7, 2015, Scott was running the AT east of Rangeley, Maine, atop Saddleback Mountain.

As of 2 PM on Thursday, July 9th, Scott was approaching Bald Mountain, with roughly 138 miles to goal to summit Katahdin. That's around a dozen miles south of Monson.

Jurek's original goal, when he set out from Springer Mountain in Georgia on May 27th, was to set the new record on Tuesday, July 7th, Day 42. That didn't happen.

On Tuesday, according to the 2015 edition of David "Awol" Miller's book, The A.T. Guide, Scott was headed toward The Horn.

Appalachian Trail Sign to Saddleback Mountain & The Horn ~~ Photograph by Robert Sutherland

Appalachian Trail Sign to Saddleback Mountain & The Horn ~~ Photograph by Robert Sutherland

When Scott made it to The Horn, he was roughly 213 miles from his goal: the end of the Trail atop Katahdin.

After running the Trail for 42 days and about 1976 miles.

Not to get all creepy, but Scott that's the area where Geraldine "Inchworm" Largay disappeared on July 22, 2013 -- almost two years ago.

Click Here for the Largay Mystery

No, Inchworm was never found.

Thru-hikers understand that Scott Jurek is tackling one of the most remote and toughest sections of the Appalachian Trail. It's hard to climb and hike around the Saddlebacks. How hard must it be to run?

This is, however, what Scott does: run. At times on this adventure, all night long. Fifty miles at a clip. Traversing the cursed PUDs -- pointless ups and downs.

We believe he will make it. At the very least, we hope he will not suffer any injuries along his path to honor and retirement. He will have to average 50-miles a day ... or more ... to succeed.

Will it break Jennifer's heart if she "loses" the speed record? Nope. She has her head on straight and her heart in the right place. She has said many times that she is at peace with the idea of someone else breaking her amazing pace. She's not a big fan of records in any case. Her achievement allows her to be an ambassador for the Appalachian Trail. Something she hopes all of us -- especially Scott Jurek -- will join her in pursuing.

We have a lot to learn from Jennifer. And from Scott.

Especially Scott ... as he heads toward the 100-Mile-Wilderness and his first glimpse of Katahdin.

Before he has to muster the strength to run to the top.

Click Here for Scott Jurek's Facebook Page

Current Weather Forecast for Monson, Maine

Click Here to See "Where on the Trail is Scott Jurek?"

"Hiking the entire Appalachian Trail isn't hard.  Just begin on Springer Mountain in Georgia and head north until you mount Mount Katahdin.  Pffft.  How hard can that be?" said no one ever. ~~  Photograph by Robert Sutherland

"Hiking the entire Appalachian Trail isn't hard. Just begin on Springer Mountain in Georgia and head north until you mount Mount Katahdin. Pffft. How hard can that be?" Said no one ever. ~~ Photograph by Robert Sutherland


Tags: Attractions, Events, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Appalachian Trail, Hiking, News, Appalachian Trail Clubs, Maine Appalachian Trail Club, Robert Sutherland Travel Writer, and Hikers

About the Author Robert Sutherland:
Robert Sutherland is a travel writer enjoying life. Robert has two adult daughters and six grandchildren.
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