Appalachian Trail Hikers Hit Winter Weather in Georgia

Published Feb 26, 2015

Ice on GA's Springer Mountain in 2014, the Southern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail ~~ Photo Courtesy of HikerHostel.com

Ice on GA's Springer Mountain in 2014, the Southern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail ~~ Photo Courtesy of HikerHostel.com

You're facing winter weather on the Appalachian Trail in Georgia.

We understand. Really. You've hoped and planned to hike the Appalachian Trail since the first time you saw a squirrel in the woods. You've made your plans. You've kissed Buffy or Rex goodbye for a few months. You quit your job. You've spent more time thinking about freeze-dried food and trekking poles than any thing or any body.

You're not going to let a little bad weather delay your start. Unless you're smart. Or your name is Nanook and you grew up on the Kuskokwim River believing walking/hiking in snowy tundra is just skookum.

There's heavy snow on the AT in Georgia, as of February 26, 2015. Ice is everywhere. Approach roads are closed.

Yes, we had a stretch of bad weather on and around Springer Mountain in Georgia -- the gateway to the Appalachian Trail northward -- back in 2013 and in 2014.

You would be wise to check the weather forecast for Northeast Georgia. Here's the 10-day Weather Channel for Blairsville, GA, as good a spot as any local town. Higher elevations will have more snow and colder temperatures.

The first "nice" day is ten days away, Saturday, March 7th, when highs might hit 50 ... down below. Until then, seven days of below freezing lows ... colder up above.

Weather Channel 10-Day Winter Weather Forecast for Blairsville, GA

Too much snow might cause you to miss this snowy turn by the spooky tree and tagged utility pole. ~~ Photograph by Robert Sutherland

Too much snow might cause you to miss this snowy turn by the spooky tree and tagged utility pole. ~~ Photograph by Robert Sutherland

No, you're not a wimp. No, we do not think you're stupid. No, we know that you laugh at blizzards, you chew on icicles and you and low wind-chills are one.

Just keep an eye on the sky. Take care of your fingers and toes. Hydrate.

Thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail has far less to do with how you suffered through your initial days ... compared to how well you preserved your body, gear and strength for the 100-Mile Wilderness and the ascent to Mt. Katahdin.

We want you to make it all the way.

Pace yourself. Stay warm. Have a good time.

Survive. Please.


Tags: Appalachian Trail, Hiking, News, Weather, Robert Sutherland Travel Writer, and Safety

About the Author Robert Sutherland:
Robert Sutherland is a travel writer enjoying life. Robert has two adult daughters and six grandchildren.
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